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77 Re: Mitre saws




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This article is from the Woodworking FAQ Collection 3, by multiple authors.

77 Re: Mitre saws

From: stampe@uhccux.uhcc.hawaii.edu (David Stampe)
Date: 24 Jul 88 20:01:17 GMT

Personally, I'd prefer to use a good hand mitre saw for most projects.

But for the sake of speed, I used a Ryobi, with a Freud carbide tip
blade, to mitre 1" x 3" white oak for a herringbone floor for 2 1/2
rooms, thousands of cuts, and they were clean and accurate throughout.
I don't know the maximum width of cut. It's not a quiet tool. I was
surprised to find that the unpainted parts showed no corrosion or rust
after long exposure to salt air that will rust a handsaw overnight.

My chief complaints (probably applicable to any mitre saw):

- I don't know any way to position the saw for cuts except by marking
the piece on the top side and trying the blade against it. I found
myself making jigs for repeated cuts. (I doubt if any simple
attached rule would work, since lengths will vary with saw angle.)

- My saw has the option kit with clamp etc. The clamp is quick but
not very positive. If you're not attentive in clamping, it may not
hold the piece dead flat on the table. But it's worth using for
important cuts, since the blade occasionally will try to move a
loosely held workpiece sideways. Some sort of deep-throat C-clamp
might work better, but would be slow for repeated cuts.

- Cutting short pieces (< 3" or so) is risky, to the workpiece if not
also to you: the clamp can't reach them, hold-down sticks don't
have enough leverage, etc. Also be careful about tiny cut-off
triangles, which go behind the fence, and might bounce back into
the blade. Wear glasses.




 

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