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53 Would you summarize the notation used?




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This article is from the RSC/UKSC Cricket FAQ, by Ganesh with numerous contributions by others.

53 Would you summarize the notation used?

Buy those guides!
But! Some of the notation used include:
[Written up by: Ian T]

Wide = a cross
Any runs are shown by placing a dot in the
appropriate number of quadrants.
e.g. a wide that evades all fielders and the batsmen
run two would be entered as such

     * | *
    ---+---
       |

No ball = A circle If runs are taken off the bat
then the number of runs is shown inside the circle.
If runs are taken BUT not off the bat then the appropriate
number of dots is included in the circle.
If no runs are taken the symbol is obviously an empty circle.


Wickets = a 'w' or some use an 'x' BUT should always be w
as the x could 'tilt' and be mistaken for a wide.
Runouts = often shown with an 'r'
Byes = an upward facing, filled in, triangle
Leg byes = a downward facing, filled in, triangle
Runs are recorded with the number.
Dot balls are just that recorded with a dot.

Email me(Ganesh or even Ian) for a truetype Font
that works with most windows software, especially
WORD. Install it using the control panel/fonts thingy...
It has almost all the standard cricket symbols.

Also worth noting:-

1. An underline under the symbol indicates the batsmen
have ended up at opposite ends to that expected.
Usually as a result of 'one short' or crossing during
a dismissal.

2. Some scorebooks have a space below the bowling
summary to record the over number and the running
score for the bowler. Keep this up to date and it's
worth its weight in gold - a very quick check when
looking for that elusive missed run when your sheet
doesn't match your colleagues! If the scorebook isn't
printed with that space then create it yourself by
marking out a small area in the corner of the summary
box. If you include the over number then the game can
be completely 'replayed' with ease using the bowlers
summary and extras sections of the scoresheet - done
properly, one can also find out how many balls each
batsmen faced.




 

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