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2.2.3. Don't the Greek do it differently? (Gregorian calendar)




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This article is from the Calendars FAQ, by Claus Tondering claus@tondering.dk with numerous contributions by others.

2.2.3. Don't the Greek do it differently? (Gregorian calendar)

When the Orthodox church in Greece finally decided to switch to the
Gregorian calendar in the 1920s, they tried to improve on the
Gregorian leap year rules, replacing the "divisible by 400" rule by
the following:

Every year which when divided by 900 leaves a remainder of 200
or 600 is a leap year.

This makes 1900, 2100, 2200, 2300, 2500, 2600, 2700, 2800 non-leap
years, whereas 2000, 2400, and 2900 are leap years. This will not
create a conflict with the rest of the world until the year 2800.

This rule gives 218 leap years every 900 years, which gives us an
average year of 365 218/900 days = 365.24222 days, which is certainly
more accurate than the official Gregorian number of 365.2425 days.

However, this rule is *not* official in Greece.

 

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