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19 Sources (Sumerian Mythology)




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This article is from the Sumerian Mythology FAQ, by Christopher Siren cbsiren@cisunix.unh.edu with numerous contributions by others.

19 Sources (Sumerian Mythology)

Black, Jeremy and Green, Anthony, _Gods, Demons and Symbols of Ancient
Mesopotamia: An Illustrated Dictionary_, University of Texas Press,
Austin, 1992. This up-to-date and thorough resource on Mesopotamian
mythology has great photos and illustrations by Tessa Rickards and
very useful entries which often indicate the times and places when
variant tales were current. My only complaint is that it is not always
clear whether information in an entry is applicable to the Sumerian,
Akkadian, or both versions of a particular deity or hero.
Crawford, Harriet, _Sumer and the Sumerians_, Cambridge University Press,
Cambridge, 1991. (This is a briefer but more up to date archaeological
look at the Sumerians than you'll find with Kramer. There isn't much
mythic content in this one, but there are many wonderful figures
detailing city plans, and the structure of temples and other
buildings.)
Kramer, Samuel Noah, and Maier, John, _Myths of Enki, the Crafty God_,
Oxford University Press, New York,1989. The most recent work that
I've been able to find by Kramer. They translate and analyze all
of the availible myths which include Enki. I've only seen it availible
in hardcover and I haven't seen it in a bookstore yet.
Kramer, Samuel Noah, _Sumerian Mythology_, Harper & Brothers, New York,
1961. This slim volume contains much of the mythological material that
wound up in _The Sumerians_ but concentrated in one spot and without
much cultural or historical detail. Many of the myths are more developed
here, some of which are only glossed over in _The Sumerians_, however in
some cases _The Sumerians_ holds the more complete or updated myth.
Kramer, Samuel Noah _The Sumerians_ The University of Chicago Press,
Chicago,1963. This is a more thorough work than Kramer's
Section at the end of _Inanna_, but the intervening 20 or so years
of additional research and translation allow _Inanna_'s section
to be perhaps more complete, regarding mythology.
Wolkstein, Diane and Kramer, Samuel Noah, _Inanna: Queen of Heaven and
Earth_, Harper & Row, NY, 1983. Ms. Wolkstein's verse
translations of the Inanna/Dummuzi cycle of myths are excellent,
and Kramer gives a 30 or so page description of Sumerian cosmology
and society at the end.
_The New American Bible_, Catholic Book Publishing Co., New York,
1970.

 

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