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103 Re: recommendations for portable planers




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This article is from the Woodworking FAQ Collection 3, by multiple authors.

103 Re: recommendations for portable planers

From: mike@cream.cs.wisc.edu
Date: 12 Mar 90 19:17:10 GMT

In article <5600005@hpcndm.CND.HP.COM> rds@hpcndm.CND.HP.COM (Dwight Schettler) writes:
>
>I am also interested in buying a planer for the shop. In addition to the
>questions that Tom brought up, I have some more general questions about
>owning a planer.

I bought the makita 12" portable planer around Christmas. So far I am quite
happy with it.

>
> 1. How much does it cost to have the knives sharpened for a 10 or
> 12 inch planer?

The makita has throw away blades. These are double sided, and cost around
$30 - 35 per set. I bought a second set with the machine, but have yet to
turn over the first set. So far I've planed about 80 board feet of
hard maple, and 40 of cherry, plus miscellaneous stuff. (That's about
5 30 gallon bags of shavings!)

>
> 2. How often will a home woodworker need to get them sharpened?

See above.

>
> 3. Is a set of carbide knives worth the investment?

See above.

>
> 4. After getting knives resharpened, is it possible for me to align
> the knives myself, or does a pro need to do it? Any special
> tools required?

The really nice feature of the makita planer is the knife alignment system.
The knives are machined with a groove in the center which fits into the
rotating drum with great precision. The drum automatically locks in place
when you remove the protective cover which comes off with two bolts, (makita
even provides the wrench.) Then they give you two magnetic holders to
handle the blade with so you don't slice your pinkies. I removed and replaced
both blades on my machine the first day in 5 minutes, just to see how it
works. It works perfectly.

The makita just appeared a bit sturdier than the ryobi to me, and I noticed
the threaded rods which perform the height adjustment are larger and more
closely machined.

I am really pleased with having a planer in the shop and use it for all sorts
of small jobs I would never have thought of buying a planer for. As an
example, I wanted to make a sliding jig to run in the miter gauge slots
on my table saw. It was trivial to make the rails fit precisely in the
slots. I planed them in both width and height in well under 1/64" increments
until they were "just right".




 

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