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12-1 Bulgarian Cinema - Historical Context: Third Generation:




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This article is from the Bulgaria FAQ, by Dragomir R. Radev radev@tune.cs.columbia.edu with numerous contributions by others.

12-1 Bulgarian Cinema - Historical Context: Third Generation:

Nikolai Volev (1946); Kiran Kolarov (1946); Ivan Pavlov (1947);
Henri Koulev (1949); Evgeni Mihailov; Peter Popzlatev (1953);
Iskra Yossifova (1954); Rumyana Petkova; Lyudmil Todorov (1955);
Krassimir Kroumov (1955); Docho Bodjakov (1956)

Some of the more memorable films of the decade are the debuts or
second works of these young directors: Rumyana Petkova's "Coming Down
to Earth" (Prizemjavane, 1985) and Iskra Yossifova's "Love Therapy"
(Ljubovna terapija, 1987) -- two genuine feminist works; Chaim Cohen's
"Protect the Small Animals" (Zashtitete drebnite zhivotni, 1988); Ivan
Rossenov's "Stop for Strangers" (Spirka za nepoznati, 1989) -- an entry in
the New School Cinema in Transition Festival in New York 1993; Peter
Popzlatev's "I, The Countess" (Az, Grafinjata, 1989) -- a chronicle of a
junkie's life that won at least five international awards; Lyudmil
Todorov's "Running Dogs" (Bjagashti kucheta, 1989) and "The Love Summer of
a Schmo" (Ljubovnoto ljato na edin ljohman, 1990) -- a charming reunion film,
full of nostalgia and recollections about a missing friend who committed
suicide; Krassimir Kroumov's "Exitus" (Ekzitus, 1989) and "Waste"
(Mylchanieto, 1991) -- two somber political and moral allegories which mark
a bright new talent's rise on the Bulgarian film horizon; Docho Bodjakov's
"Thou Which Art in Heaven" (Ti, kojto si na nebeto; 1990) and "The Well"
(Kladenecyt, 1991) -- another entry in the New School Cinema in Transition
Festival, and another hot name on the list of the most significant
Bulgarian filmmakers.
These third genaration directors and some of their older colleagues --
Nikolai Volev, Georgi Djulgerov, Ivan Andonov, Rangel Vulchanov -- who
appear to be revitalized by the new challenges the Bulgarian film artist is
facing, are nourishing the hope that the "White years" are almost here.

Periods of Bulgarian cinema:
I. Green years (1958-1970)
II. Red years (1971-1983)
III. Black years (1984-?)
IV. White years ?

 

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