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8. Off-ice training and endurance




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This article is from the Recreational Figure Skating FAQ, by Karen Bryden with numerous contributions by others.

8. Off-ice training and endurance

Ice skating is probably one of the healthiest forms of exercise.
Before you go on the ice to skate, warm up your muscles and stretch
them. This can go a long way to prevention of sore muscles and injury.

While off-ice training isn't necessary for recreational skating, it
will help you to progress more quickly and besides, it's good for you!
For excellent references on stretching and training muscles, check out
the FAQ's in rec.dance and rec.fitness.

Training programs for competitive skaters are very rigorous. In
preparation for competitions the skater must improve their anaerobic
endurance, since the skater's heart rate is way above what they could
maintain for any length of time. Skating flat out for 4 1/2 minutes
requires an incredible level of stamina!

For the rest of us, aerobics classes are a good bet. Find one with
lots of floor work and stretching. Stair climbing is excellent. Try
taking them two at a time. Other good complementary activities are
cycling, swimming, power walking and other forms of low-impact aerobic
exercise, especially if you can include them as part of your
post-skating stretch and cool down period.

A ballet class can be very helpful. It will improve posture, break the
habit of looking at your feet, and teach you how to "find your center"
(shoulders, hips, and feet in a vertical line).

As always, the *best* exercise/training program is one that you can
integrate into your lifestyle and maintain over an extended period of
time.

 

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