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6.2 Freestyle skating




Description

This article is from the Recreational Figure Skating FAQ, by Karen Bryden with numerous contributions by others.

6.2 Freestyle skating

Oh, I have slipped the surly bonds of earth
And danced the skies on laughter silvered wings
from High Flight, by John Gillespie Magee Jr.

Jumps and spins cannot be mastered without good edges and upper body
control since it is this that sets the stage for what follows. The
approach to a jump is as important as the jump itself, since it is the
approaching footwork that gets your entire body into the right
position to jump.

The main reason to jump and spin in the same direction is that you use
the spins to safely practice jumping technique. The back spin in
particular is used as a preliminary to the loop, which is in turn used
as a preliminary to the Axel. Ultimately the rotation, air-position,
landing, and exit for all the major jumps are the same, and are all
developed from the backspin.

Several single jumps are described below, roughly in order of
difficulty. They are first defined in terms of the take-off edge,
whether or not a toepick is used, and the amount of rotation. For the
sake of brevity, all the jumps are explained for counter-clockwise
rotation.

 

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