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2.3.2 Hockey stops




Description

This article is from the Recreational Figure Skating FAQ, by Karen Bryden with numerous contributions by others.

2.3.2 Hockey stops

See about down-up-down. Hockey stops involve an up-down movement and a
slight forward shift of weight to the part of the blade under the
balls of your feet. With both skates together and on the ice, rise up
, which will cause your weight to rock forward a bit. Quickly turn
your skates 90 degrees to the side which will cause them to skid, and
then sink down again, leaning slightly away from the direction of
travel, which will press the edges into the ice.

After you have completed a hockey stop, your upper body -- head,
shoulders and torso -- will STILL be facing in the original direction
of motion. Your arms may not be exactly perpendicular to that
direction; in fact, the "back" arm (the one that corresponds to the
trailing skate) may be slightly forward to assist in the twist and
help maintain balance.

BUT

Your lower body will be facing at 90 degrees from the original
direction of motion. Your knees and toes will be pointing toward the
side, and your hips will also be facing toward the side. This
position, in which the upper body is twisted at (approx.) 90 degrees
from the lower body is VERY COMMON in various skating moves, so you
might as well get used to it.

 

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