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9.16 Trackstands




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This article is from the Bicycles FAQ, by Mike Iglesias with numerous contributions by others.

9.16 Trackstands

From: Rick Smith <ricks@sdd.hp.com>

How to trackstand on a road bike.

With acknowledgments to my trackstanding mentor,
Neil Bankston.

Practice, Practice, Practice, Practice, ....

1. Wear tennis shoes.
2. Find an open area, like a parking lot that has a slight grade to it.
3. Put bike in a gear around a 42-18.
4. Ride around out of the saddle in a counter-clockwise circle, about
10 feet in diameter.

Label Notation for imaginary points on the circle:
'A' is the lowest elevation point on the circle.
'B' is the 90 degrees counterclockwise from 'A' .
'C' is the highest elevation point on the circle.
'D' is the 90 degrees counterclockwise from 'C' .

        C
      /   \
     D     B       Aerial View 
      \   /
        A

5. Start slowing down, feeling the different sensation as the bike
transitions between going uphill (B) and downhill (D).
6. Start trying to go real slowly through the A - B region of the circle.
This is the region you will use for trackstanding. Ride the rest of
the circle as you were in step 5.

The trackstanding position (aerial view again):

	       ---|   /
	------| |----/
           |---     /


The pedal are in a 3 o'clock - 9 o'clock arrangement (in other
words, parallel to the ground). Your left foot is forward, your
wheel is pointed left. You are standing and shifting you weight
to keep balance. The key to it all is this:

If you start to fall left, push on the left pedal to move the
bike forward a little and bring you back into balance.

If you start to fall right, let up on the pedal and let the
bike roll back a little and bring you back into balance.

7. Each time you roll through the A - B region, try to stop when
the left pedal is horizontal and forward. If you start to
lose your balance, just continue around the circle and try it
again.

8. Play with it. Try doing it in various regions in the circle,
with various foot position, and various amounts of turn in your
steering. Try it on different amounts of slope in the
pavement. Try different gears. What you are shooting for is
the feel that's involved, and it comes with practice.

 

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