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7.3. Books on implementations (Programming threads)




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This article is from the Threads Programming FAQ, by Bryan O'Sullivan bos@serpentine.com with numerous contributions by others.

7.3. Books on implementations (Programming threads)

If you are interested in how modern operating systems support threads
and multiprocessors, there are a few excellent books available that
may be of interest to you.

Curt Schimmel, "Unix Systems for Modern Architectures".
Addison-Wesley, ISBN 0-201-63338-8.
<URL: http://www.aw.com/cp/schimmel.html>
This book gives a lucid account of the work needed to get Unix
(or, for that matter, more or less anything else) working on a
modern system that incorporates multiple processors, each with
its own cache. While it has some overlap with the Vahalia book
(see below), it has a smaller scope, and thus deals with shared
topics in more detail.

Uresh Vahalia, "Unix Internals: the New Frontiers". Prentice Hall,
ISBN 0-13-101908-2.
<URL: http://www.prenhall.com/013/101907/10190-7.html>
This is the best kernel internals book currently available. It
deals extensively with building multithreaded kernels,
implementing LWPs, and scheduling on multiprocessors. Given a
choice, I would buy "both" this and the Schimmel book.

Ben Catanzaro, "Multiprocessor System Architectures". SunSoft Press,
ISBN 0-13-089137-1.
<URL: http://www.sun.com/smi/ssoftpress/books/Catanzaro/Catanza
ro.html>
I don't know much about this book, but it deals with both the
hardware and software (kernel and user) architectures used to
put together modern multiprocessor systems.

 

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