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26 Robotics Competitions part11 Robotic Sumo Wrestling: The Tradition Continues




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This article is from the Robotics FAQ, by Kevin Dowling nivek@cs.cmu.edu with numerous contributions by others.

26 Robotics Competitions part11 Robotic Sumo Wrestling: The Tradition Continues

This contest matches your own creation with another robot in the
field of combat where brute strength and cat-like reflexes
combine to create the ultimate battle! The challenge is to
create a robot whose sole purpose is to push, throw, flip, drag,
or otherwise move your opponent out of a five foot diameter
circular ring within 3 minutes.

In the tradition of an ancient Japanese contest of similar name,
SUMO wrestling robots can use any trick the creator conceives to
get the job done, within the following limits:

* No robot may be used which is a physical threat to other
contestants or the audience. (i.e., Explosions, fire,
bullets, mace etc...)
* Robots must fit within a 9" x 9" square when the
competition begins, but may expand to a larger size
after battle starts. Height is unrestricted at all
times.
* Robots must be 11 pounds or less in weight.
* After the battle is over, contestants are responsible
for cleaning up any debris in the ring to the

There are two separate classes to SUMO robotic wrestling:
Autonomous and Remote-Control.

Remote Control robots may be a radio or wired-remote control and
may be operated by a biological (human, usually).

Autonomous Robots must carry on-board all power and intelligence
required to seek and conquer the enemy.

Each robot class will be awarded its own prize!
(Prizes will also be awarded for the most humorous entry)

ATOMIC HOCKEY

You have never seen the NHL like this before! A head-to-head
game of robot mayhem played out on an atomic scale as each
competitor fights for the opportunity to gather more protons than
his opponent while avoiding the ever present electrons!

Played out in a 5 foot diameter circular ring lined with a 2 inch
high wall, the robots must locate and gather Ping-Pong balls
(protons) and deposit them in their own goal (the nucleus) within
a three minute period while their opponents do the same. Each
proton carries a score of +1 point.

Unfortunately, the ring also contains an equal number of small
metal balls (electrons) worth -1 point each. Each electron in
your nucleus reduces your score by one point, so be careful to
avoid them (or at least put them in your opponent's nucleus)!

* Robots are to be a maximum of 9" x 9" square with
unlimited height and have no weight restriction.
* Robots must not pose any physical threat to biologicals
(see SUMO rules).
* Autonomous robots may put any signaling device they wish
in their nucleus to help the robot locate the goal.
* Aggressive and devious play between robots is
encouraged, so long as no damage occurs to the ring or
room.

As with Robotic SUMO Wrestling, there are two categories: Autonomous
and Remote Controlled ( Radio or Tethered ) New for 1994 is the
introduction of the BEAM Solaroller, Photovore, Walker and
BEAM-Aesthetics events - more details to follow!

For a complete rule set for both competitions and application
information, please email, phone, fax, or (gasp) write to me at:

Craig Maynard
Instructor, Electrical/Electronics Department,
Southern Alberta Institute of Technology
1301-16th Ave NW
Calgary, Alberta
T2M-0L4
Phone (403) 284-8401 Fax (403) 284-8184
Email:[54]
maynard@trantor.el.sait.ab.ca

or
Dave Hrynkiw
BEAM Coordinator
email:[55]
hrynkiwd@cuug.ab.ca

 

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