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26 References for part II (Ozone Depletion: Stratospheric Chlorine and Bromine)




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This article is from the Ozone Depletion: Stratospheric Chlorine and Bromine FAQ, by Robert Parson rparson@spot.colorado.edu with numerous contributions by others.

26 References for part II (Ozone Depletion: Stratospheric Chlorine and Bromine)

A remark on references: they are neither representative nor
comprehensive. There are _hundreds_ of people working on these
problems. For the most part I have limited myself to papers that
are (1) widely available (if possible, _Science_ or _Nature_ rather
than archival sources such as _J. Geophys. Res._) and (2) directly
related to the "frequently asked questions". (In this part, I have
had to refer to archival journals more often than I would have
liked, since in many cases that is the only place where the
question is addressed in satisfactory detail.) Readers who want to
see "who did what" should consult the review articles listed below,
or, if they can get them, the extensively documented WMO reports.

 

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