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2.3 What are some recommended CED player models?




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This article is from the RCA SelectaVision VideoDisc FAQ, by tom@cedmagic.com (Tom Howe) with numerous contributions by others.

2.3 What are some recommended CED player models?

There are two models I'd recommend any serious CED collector to seek
out, the RCA SGT250 and SJT400 (or the much rarer SKT400). Once you've
gotten used to the 400 series players, it's hard to return to any of the
earlier models that lack a multi-function remote control. The random
access SJT400 uses an IR remote that permits numerous user control
functions such as time seek, band seek, programmed time play, programmed
band play, and program repeat. In addition, it allows the player to be
placed in page mode, the CED equivalent of freeze-frame, except the same
four video frames are shown repeatedly. In page mode the displayed image
may or may not be jittery, depending on the rate of motion in the
original scene. It is also possible to simulate slow motion while in
page mode by repeatedly pressing the NEXT key to advance the stylus over
the disc groove-by-groove. A 400 series player is required to play the
interactive VideoDisc titles in random access mode, although these discs
can be played straight-through on any CED player, but usually with
nonsensical results.

I recommend the SGT250 because it was the last RCA player model to use
the original-style stylus cartridge. In the years to come these stylus
cartridges will probably be more readily available, for the simple
reason that most everyone collecting CED discs is using a J or K series
player. The SGT250 is sort of a cross between the G and J lines in that
it has the chassis of the G line but the electronic "soft-touch"
operation of the J line. This model also uses a simplified IR remote
permitting rapid forward/reverse, visual search forward/reverse, and
pause. Internally, this unit has the most solid construction of any
player model I have seen.

If I was going to recommend against any player models, it would be the
Hitachi manufactured units and their name-brand equivalents. This is
because the Hitachi-style stylus cartridges are already difficult to
find, and will only become more so.


 

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previous page: 2.2 How many CED players were manufactured over what time span?
  
page up: RCA SelectaVision VideoDisc FAQ
  
next page: 2.4 The RCA K series players appear externally identical to their Jseries counterparts. What changes were made in the K series?