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1.15 Who were some of the key people involved in bringing the CEDsystem from research concept to a manufacturable product?




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This article is from the RCA SelectaVision VideoDisc FAQ, by tom@cedmagic.com (Tom Howe) with numerous contributions by others.

1.15 Who were some of the key people involved in bringing the CEDsystem from research concept to a manufacturable product?

Thomas Stanley of RCA Laboratories suggested in 1959 that video could be
stored capacitively on a vinyl disc if a means could be found to mold
sufficiently small signal elements in the surface of the vinyl. Formal
research on this concept began at RCA Labs in 1964, and really took off
when the team of Jon Clemens and Eugene Keizer was put together shortly
thereafter. Dr. Clemens was a recent graduate of MIT and was deeply
involved with getting CED to market and can rightly be called "the father
of the CED." He applied for U.S. Patent No. 3,842,194 on March 22, 1971,
which is the primordial CED patent, as hundreds of those that followed
reference it.

Richard Sonnenfeldt was Vice President in charge of VideoDisc during the
development phase from 1974 to 1978. Jay Brandinger was VideoDisc Vice
President during the push to market phase from 1979 to 1981 as well as
the market phase from 1981 through 1984. There were some 2,000 RCA
employees involved with CED during its development and time on the
market, many of whom are covered in the "Memories of VideoDisc" section
at the CED Magic web site:

http://www.cedmagic.com/mem

The 1981 David Sarnoff Awards for Outstanding Technical Achievement were
awarded to the nine scientists and engineers who RCA felt contributed the
most to getting CED on the market. Here's a brief summary:

Todd Christopher- for player electronics and signal encoding standards.
Jon Clemens- as the key architect of the CED system as a whole.
Pabitra Datta- for developing the carbon filler of the conductive disc.
Leonard Fox- for conceiving and championing the conductive disc concept.
Jerome Halter- for the development of electromechanical cutterheads.
Eugene Keizer- for major contributions to mastering and stylus design.
Marvin Leedom- for mechanical design including the caddy concept.
Michael Miller- for the stylus cartridge and associated mechanisms.
Fred Stave- for the disc/caddy interface and other mechanical concepts.


 

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previous page: 1.14 Grooved records containing images and sounds of Earth were placedon the two NASA Voyager spacecraft launched in 1977. Were these CED's?
  
page up: RCA SelectaVision VideoDisc FAQ
  
next page: 1.16 Why did the CED system fail to even come close to RCA's expectedmarket penetration?