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3.25 Where can I get DOS drivers for my ethernet card?




Description

This item is from the PC Hardware FAQ, by Willie Lim and Ralph Valentino with numerous contributions by others. (v1.25).

3.25 Where can I get DOS drivers for my ethernet card?

[From: ralf@alum.wpi.edu (Ralph Valentino)]

The first thing you need is a low level packet driver for your ethernet card. This driver links your card specific functions to a common software interface allowing higher level software to read and write to your ethernet card without knowing any of the hardware specifics. Ethernet cards usually come with a packet driver. If you didn't get one, try contacting the card manufacturer (they may have a www/ftp site, see the references section of this FAQ).

Another option is using publicly available packet drivers. The Crynwr packet driver collection is free, supports a significant number of cards and comes with sources and documentation. You can find this package in the "pktdrvr" subdirectory on any of the Simtel mirrors. For instance:

wuarchive.wustl.edu:/systems/ibmpc/simtel/pktdrvr/ (ftp://wuarchive.wustl.edu/systems/ibmpc/simtel/pktdrvr/) ftp://ftp.uu.net/systems/msdos/simtel/pktdrvr/

The files of interest are:

pktdrvr11.zip - executable

pktdrvr11a.zip pktdrvr11b.zip pktdrvr11c.zip - sources

The included instructions explain how to install them. The file "software.doc" (within the zip archive) contains pointers to a number of other useful protocol drivers, which is the next thing you need.

The protocol driver sits on top of the packet driver and implements one of the many standard protocols (IPX, TCP/IP, etc).

IPX protocol drivers, needed for many multiplayer games, can be found in the same "pktdrvr" directory as the Crynwr packet drivers. Files of interest are:

novel.zip - IPX protocol driver from BYU

intelpd.zip - IPX protocol driver from Intel (newer)

Either of the above will do.

For a quick TCP/IP implementation allowing telnet and file transfers with both Unix and other DOS machines with very little setup, try Kermit. You can get Kermit from the Columbia University distribution site:

kermit.cc.columbia.edu:systems/msdos/msvibm.zip - everything you need for DOS and more

To make a connection, type:

   set tcp/ip address *.*.*.* (where *.*.*.* is your IP address)
   set port tcp/ip *.*.*.*    (where *.*.*.* is the destination IP address)
   connect

Remember to type "set file type binary" at the Kermit prompt on both ends if you are transfering binary files (anything but unarchived text). See the documentation and on-line help for time transfer optimization as well as how to set the rest of the TCP/IP related parameters (netmast, broadcast address, bootp server, nameserver, etc) if you are interfacing to an existing network.

Another program of interest is NCSA Telnet.

    ftp.ncsa.uiuc.edu:PC/Telnet/tel23bin.zip - binaries
    ftp.ncsa.uiuc.edu:PC/Telnet/tel23src.zip - sources

Many commercial protocol drivers/applications are also available, including Windows for Workgroups, PC/TCP, WIN/TCP and PC-NFS, to name a few. See your local software store for information on these.

 

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