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3-16] How do I convert home movies into video on CD?




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This article is from the CD-Recordable FAQ, by Andy McFadden (fadden@fadden.com) with numerous contributions by others.

3-16] How do I convert home movies into video on CD?

(2002/11/22)

This topic is largely outside the scope of this FAQ, so I'm not going to go
into much depth. The Usenet newsgroup news:rec.desktop.video is more
applicable. I'm not aware of an FAQ for that group, but the links found at
http://www.videoguys.com/jump.htm will get you started.

You need a capture device to transfer the video to your hard drive.
Capturing high-quality video can eat up 2MB or more per *second* of video
at full resolution (640x480x24 at 60 fields per second for NTSC) with a
reasonable degree of compression, so this isn't something to be undertaken
lightly. The lower your quality requirements, the lower the bandwidth
requirements. On a fast machine, you can even get away with just a TV
tuner card, using the software from http://www.winvcr.com/.

If MPEG is your only interest, you might be better off with an MPEG-only
card rather than a hobbyist video capture board. http://www.b-way.com/
and http://www.darvision.com/ are good places to look. The Broadway
card has been given high marks for quality.

Once you've captured the video, you'll probably want to edit it, at least
to clip out unwanted portions or add titles. Packages for doing this,
like Adobe Premiere and Ulead MediaStudio, are usually included with the
capture card. These will also let you adjust the resolution, color depth,
and compression quality to output the video so that it's suitable for
playback on double- or quad-speed CD-ROM drives.

You can convert AVI files to MPEG and vice-versa with a program from Ulead
(see http://www.ulead.com/), Xing Technologies, or several other vendors.
You should be able to create QuickTime or AVI movies using the compression
codec of your choice from the video editing software. A good choice is
TMPGEncoder, from http://www.tmpgenc.com/e_main.html.

Once created, you can write the AVI, MPEG, or MOV (QuickTime) file to a
CD-ROM like you would anything else. If you'd like to view the disc in a
DVD player or other VideoCD playback device, read the next section. Note
that not all DVD players are capable of reading CD-R media, so if VideoCD
on CD-R playback is important to you, check the DVD player feature set
before you buy.

Converting directly to DVD format is pretty reasonable now, with relatively
inexpensive DVD-R recorders and authoring software. Some Macintoshes ship
with iMovie/iDVD and a DVD recorder built in.

The MPV (MultiPhoto/Video) specification was announced in November 2002.
It's purpose is to define a standard way of storing pictures, videos,
and audio on digital media. This could eventually be the preferred way
to store movies on a disc. See http://www.osta.org/mpv/.


 

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