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2-34] Can I make copies of DTS-encoded CDs?




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This article is from the CD-Recordable FAQ, by Andy McFadden (fadden@fadden.com) with numerous contributions by others.

2-34] Can I make copies of DTS-encoded CDs?

(2000/12/13)

Yes. CDs encoded with DTS (Digital Theater Sound) follow the Red Book
standard for the most part. The chief difference is that the audio is
encoded with DTS rather than 44.1KHz 16-bit stereo PCM. If you put one
into an audio CD player, it will recognize the tracks and try to play them,
resulting in a hissing noise.

You can copy DTS CDs the way you would any other audio CD. Attempting
to convert them to MP3 is a bad idea though -- they're already in a
compressed format.

A common way to play DTS-encoded CDs is with a DVD player connected to a
DTS-capable receiver. The DVD player passes multichannel audio to the
receiver over an S/PDIF connection. Many DTS CDs are encoded in 5.1
surround sound, which is kinda neat.


 

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