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3.2.3.1) What are some currently available sound editors for the NeXT?




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This article is from the Electronic and Computer Music FAQ, by Craig Latta Craig.Latta@NetJam.ORG with numerous contributions by others.

3.2.3.1) What are some currently available sound editors for the NeXT?



Date: Sat, 21 Mar 1992 18:25:21 -0600
From: NeXTmusic Mailing List <nextmusic@wri.com>
Subject: Sound Editors
From: "Paul Lansky" <paul@silvertone.Princeton.EDU>

In a previous post there was some discussion of Soundworks
and a reference to some of the sound editors on the princeton
server. I thought I would clear up some confusion by posting
a list of everything I know about available sound editors

1) Soundworks: available from Metaresearch.
Has some great features, but a new version
is forthcoming which should be much better

2) Edsnd: by Jamie pritchard, at pub/music at princeton.EDU
based on the original soundeditor by
lee boynton, with cut/paste, fft and spectral
views added.

3) Edsnd2: by Jamey Pritchard, at princeton.EDU
Comes up with a time-line instead of a soundview
and you can then select any portion to view.
I added a marker system which can be saved
as a simple ascii file, and can cue arbitrary
sections of a soundfile. Quite useful for
parsing soundfiles. I used this and RT
exclusively to prepare a 20 minute piece
by Steve Mackey for CD. We never touched
his original soundfiles.

4) edsndP: by Stephen Master, at princeton.EDU
This is a rewrite of the original edsnd using
Metaresearch's dataController and dataView objects.
It is very fast, and has lots of neat features.
I think it is the best one so far, although it
could use a marker system. The appended "P" is
a long story which I'll tell privately to anyone
who really wants to know.

5) SE: The IRCAM signal editor, available at ccrma-ftp.stanford.EDU
This has some really incredible features. It has to
be seen to be believed. It is a different approach
than all the others, but it can be quite useful.
Its main drawback at the moment is that it only
accepts mono files.

7 Spectro: by Perry cook, available at stanford
does "waterfall plots" of spectra
Emulates a Hewlett-Packard spectrum analyzer.

8) Sonogram: a very nice grey-scale spectral analyzer, available
on most of the archive sites.

-------------------
sort of signal editors

9) Ein: at Princeton, by me and Ken Steiglitz
dsp scratch pad, with spectral, fft and soundviews

10) RT: at Princeton, by me and Kent Dickey
real-time mixer and editor. Pete Yadlowsky
added a very nice lisp front end.

-------------------
forthcoming commercial software

11) Holstein, from Stealth Technology. The Stealth DAI 2400 is the
digital audio interface, and the ADA1800 is the A-D-A plus digital
audio interface. Don't know anything about it

12) Singular Solutions updates. Don't know anything about it

-----------------------------

I'm sure I've left out a few. Someone please complete
the list. (I'd be glad to store all these at Princeton.) While these programs do a lot, there are still a lot of
things we could use. It would be interesting to discuss
these things here. (for example: it might be nice to have a
scrubbing routine that would allow you to rock back and forth
the way we used to do with tape-heads (ouch)) (I'd also love
a visual editor for RT).

Paul Lansky

 

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