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7. What are the different versions of Blade Runner?




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This article is from the Blade Runner FAQ, by Murray Chapmanmuzzle@cs.uq.oz.au with numerous contributions by others.

7. What are the different versions of Blade Runner?


- US Denver/Dallas Sneak Preview/Workprint (1982)
- US San Diego Sneak Preview (1982)
- US Theatrical Release (1982)
- European Theatrical Release (1982)
- The Director's Cut (BRDC) (1992)

The Video Watchdog article which claims there are seven different versions
is discussed in section 13.

Hampton Fancher did several drafts of the screenplay. These drafts concluded
with Deckard taking Rachael out of the city, letting her see nature for the
first time, and then, because she doesn't want to be caught by the police,
shooting her in the snow. David Peoples was brought in to polish the script,
and Ridley Scott asked him to include more detective work. Peoples worked on
the humanity of Deckard's adversaries. His daughter mentioned the biological
term "replicate", which led to "replicant". Peoples also told Scott that the
screenplay was virtually perfect before he worked on it. [Source: Los Angeles
Times Magazine, September 13, 1992: p. 20.]

The rumours of a three-hour version of BR are just that: rumours. No version
of the script could be made into a film of that length. Mary was cut before
any of her scenes were filmed.

Contracts under the terms of the Hollywood Director's Guild usually allow 6
weeks for the director to assemble a cut of the film without studio
interference as he would like it to be seen. This "director's cut" is fully
edited and has a synchhronized sound track. This cut is usually not color
corrected or density corrected and may not even have the final music and
effects tracks. In more recent times the term "Director's Cut" has taken on a
popular meaning that implies a polished final cut of the film that the
director has complete artistic control over. BRDC fits the latter
definition. The now legendary "workprint" seen at the Nuart and Castro
theaters, fits the former.

 

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