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2.1 What resources for translators are available on the network?




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This article is from the sci.lang.translation FAQ, by James Hester (jrh@nirim.go.jp) with numerous contributions by others.

2.1 What resources for translators are available on the network?


This list is by no means comprehensive. Creating a comprehensive list
seems akin to reinventing the wheel, as the WWW sites listed below
already provide a lot of useful information about translating
resources.

World Wide Web:
--------------

If you have WWW access, the following site provides many useful links:

*The Translator's Home Companion*:

http://www.lai.com/lai/companion.html

*Aquarius*

Another good starting point is Aquarius, especially if you're looking for
a translator or want to advertise your services:

http://aquarius.net

*Las Vegas Court Interpreters/Translators Home Page*

Featuring the Dancing Interpreters Chorus Line...

http://www.lasvegas-nexus.com/jrwilson/clvmcip/clvci.htm

*EURODICAUTOM*

EURODICAUTOM is the European Commission's 9-language, free of charge
terminology databank. It includes 5 million term units and 160,000
abbreviations in the official EC languages (but not yet in Finnish and
Swedish).

Experimental web access to EURODICAUTOM (slow):

http://www.uni-frankfurt.de/~felix/eurodicautom.html

Also of interest, ECHO's 'I'M Europe' home page:

http://www.echo.lu/

*Language Conference List*

The Language Conference List at URL

http://www.clark.net/pub/royfc/confer.html

contains a chronologically sorted list of names for nearly 200
conferences with links to the location of full conference information.
The conferences are for anyone interested in languages: teachers,
translators, interpreters, and those interested in natural language
processing.

*NLLIA LATTICE Database*

LATTICE is the Language and Technology Centre of the National
Languages and Literacy Institute of Australia, and is based at The
University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. It provides a number of
information services for language, literacy and linguistics
specialists. While the primary audience is located in Australia and
New Zealand, much of the information is relevant to global audiences.

http://www.cltr.uq.oz.au:8000/

FTP:
---

*Microsoft glossaries*:

ftp.microsoft.com /developr/msdn/newup/glossary

The latest terminology for FRN, GER, SPA, ITA, SWE, DUT, FIN, DAN,
NOR, RUS, CZE, HUN, POL, TUR, GRE, BRA_POR and PRC is contained in
separate .ZIP files identified by language/country name. The
compressed files cover various Microsoft applications and systems, not
just the simple subset found in the Microsoft GUI Guide. The files
are comma-delimited ANSI files that should be readable by most
software products. (Compuserve users can also check under `Other')

*frequency lists*

for the ACL/DCI and LOB corpora:

ftp://VAXSAR.VASSAR.EDU/nlp/

Other:

*Frequency Lists*

English language frequency list for the ACL/DCI and LOB corpora:

gopher://gopher.sil.org/11/gopher_root/linguistics/info/

*Microsoft Glossaries*

The international glossaries of Microsoft applications and systems
(zipped by language) are available on CompuServe, in the:
MS DEV Network Forum (GO MSDNLIB)
in the New Uploads library.

 

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