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199 sentences grammatical in both Old English and Modern English (Miscellany - alt.usage.english)




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This article is from the alt.usage.english FAQ, by Mark Israel misrael@scripps.edu with numerous contributions by others.

199 sentences grammatical in both Old English and Modern English (Miscellany - alt.usage.english)


Mitchell and Robinson's "A Guide to Old English" (OUP, 5th
edition, 1992, ISBN 0-631-16657-2) starts its "Practice Sentences"
section with a few of these. A sampling:

Harold is swift. His hand is strong and his word grim. Late in
life he went to his wife in Rome.

Grind his corn for him and sing me his song.

He swam west in storm and wind and frost.

There is an English-to-Old-English Dictionary: "Wordcraft", by
Stephen Pollington (Anglo-Saxon Books, 1993, ISBN 1-898281-02-5).

 

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