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28.7 Feminism and Women of Color:




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This article is from the Feminism References FAQ, by Cindy Tittle Moore tittle@netcom.com with numerous contributions by others.

28.7 Feminism and Women of Color:

In _feminist theory from margin to center_ (1984), bell hooks
writes of "militant white women" who call themselves "radical
feminists" but hooks labels them "reactionary" . . . Hooks is
refering to cultural feminism here. Her comment is a good
introduction to that fractious variety of feminism that Jaggar and
Rothenberg find hard to label any further than to designate its
source as women of color. It is a most vital variety, covering
much of the same ground as radical feminism and duplicating its
dynamic nature. Yet bad timing kept the two from ever uniting.
For more information you might want to also read hooks' book and
her earlier reader, _ain't i a woman?_ Whereas radical feminism
was primarily formulated by educated white women focusing on
women's issues, this variety was formulated by women who would not
(because they could not) limit their focus. What is so
extraordinary is that the two converged in so many ways, with the
notable exception that the women of color were adamantly opposed
to considering one form of oppression (sexism) without considering
the others. [JD]

I think an important work in the history of feminism and women of
color is Gloria Anzaldua and Cherrie Moraga's anthology, _This
Bridge Called My Back: Writings By Radical Women of Color_. It's
my belief that the unique contribution of women of color, who
experience at least two forms of discrimination daily, provides
balance and reality to much of the more theoretical forms of
academic feminism favored by educated white women. [EE]

 

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