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3) When evaluating whether there might be a connection between static EM fields and cancer, do we have to consider EM radiation as well as EM fields?




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This article is from the Static Electromagnetic Fields and Cancer FAQ, by John Moulder jmoulder@its.mcw.edu and the Medical College of Wisconsin with numerous contributions by others.

3) When evaluating whether there might be a connection between static EM fields and cancer, do we have to consider EM radiation as well as EM fields?

No. Static EM sources do not produce radiation.

In general, EM sources produce both radiant energy (radiation) and non-
radiant energy (fields). Radiated energy exists apart from its source,
travels away from the source, and continues to exist even if the source
is turned off. Fields are not projected away into space, and cease to
exist when the energy source is turned off. For static EM fields there
is no radiative component.

 

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previous page: 2) When evaluating whether there might be a connection between EM fields and cancer, can all EM fields be considered the same?
  
page up: Static Electromagnetic Fields and Cancer FAQ
  
next page: 4) When evaluating whether there might be a connection between static EM fields and cancer, do we have to consider the electric as well as the magnetic component of the field?