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19) Have any independent bodies reviewed the research on static electric and magnetic fields and possible human health effects?




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This article is from the Static Electromagnetic Fields and Cancer FAQ, by John Moulder jmoulder@its.mcw.edu and the Medical College of Wisconsin with numerous contributions by others.

19) Have any independent bodies reviewed the research on static electric and magnetic fields and possible human health effects?

Yes. There have recently been a number of such reviews of the
epidemiological and laboratory literature. None of these reviews have
concluded that static magnetic or electrical fields of the intensity
encountered in residential and occupational settings are human health
hazards.

A 1993 review by the United Kingdom (British) National Radiological
Protection Board [58] concluded that for static electric fields "there
is no biological evidence from which basic restrictions on human
exposure to static electric fields can be derived... " and that "for
most people, the annoying perception of surface electric charge... will
not occur during exposure to static electric fields of less than about
25 kV/m".

For static magnetic fields the NRPB [58] concluded that: "there is no
direct experimental evidence of any acute, adverse effect on human
health due to short-term exposure to static magnetic fields up to about
2 T [2000 mT]... Effects on behavior or cardiac function from exposure
to much higher magnetic flux densities than 2 T [2000 mT] cannot be
ruled out... There is little experimental information on the effects of
chronic exposure. So far, no long term effects have become apparent...
There is no convincing evidence that static magnetic fields are
mutagenic... Tumor progression and, by implication, tumor promotion
seems to be unaffected by exposure to static fields of at least 1 T
[1000 mT]"

In 1993, the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists
(ACGIH) [59] concluded in their review of the literature of static
magnetic fields that: "no specific target organs for deleterious
magnetic field effects can be identified at the present time... Although
some effects [of static magnetic fields] have been observed in both
humans and animals, there have not been any clearly deleterious effects
conclusively demonstrated at magnetic field levels up to 2 T [2000 mT]."

In 1994, the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation
Protection (ICNIRP) [50] concluded that: "current scientific knowledge
does not suggest any detrimental effect on major developmental,
behavioral and physiological parameters in higher organisms for
transient exposure to static field densities up to 2 T [2000 mT]. From
analysis of the established interactions, long-term exposure to magnetic
flux densities of 200 mT should not have adverse consequences."

 

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