lotus

previous page: 31 ASSESSMENT OF ATHEROSCLEROSIS RISK: Triglycerides, Cholesterol, HDL Cholesterol, LDL Cholesterol, Chol/HDL ratio
  
page up: Interpretation Of Lab Test Profiles
  
next page: 33 RBC (Red Blood Cell) COUNT

32 TRIGLYCERIDES




Description

This article is from the Interpretation Of Lab Test Profiles, by Ed Uthman uthman@neosoft.com with numerous contributions by others.

32 TRIGLYCERIDES

Markedly increased triglycerides (>500 mg/dL) usually indicate
a nonfasting patient (i.e., one having consumed any calories
within 12-14 hour period prior to specimen collection). If
patient is fasting, hypertriglyceridemia is seen in
hyperlipoproteinemia types I, IIb, III, IV, and V. Exact
classification theoretically requires lipoprotein
electrophoresis, but this is not usually necessary to assess a
patient's risk to atherosclerosis [See "Assessment of
Atherosclerosis Risk," above]. Cholestyramine, corticosteroids,
estrogens, ethanol, miconazole (intravenous), oral
contraceptives, spironolactone, stress, and high carbohydrate
intake are known to increase triglycerides. Decreased serum
triglycerides are seen in abetalipoproteinemia, chronic
obstructive pulmonary disease, hyperthyroidism, malnutrition,
and malabsorption states.

 

Continue to:













TOP
previous page: 31 ASSESSMENT OF ATHEROSCLEROSIS RISK: Triglycerides, Cholesterol, HDL Cholesterol, LDL Cholesterol, Chol/HDL ratio
  
page up: Interpretation Of Lab Test Profiles
  
next page: 33 RBC (Red Blood Cell) COUNT