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06 CHLORIDE




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This article is from the Interpretation Of Lab Test Profiles, by Ed Uthman uthman@neosoft.com with numerous contributions by others.

06 CHLORIDE

Increase in serum chloride is seen in dehydration, renal
tubular acidosis, acute renal failure, diabetes insipidus,
prolonged diarrhea, salicylate toxicity, respiratory alkalosis,
hypothalamic lesions, and adrenocortical hyperfunction. Drugs
causing increased chloride include acetazolamide, androgens,
corticosteroids, cholestyramine, diazoxide, estrogens,
guanethidine, methyldopa, oxyphenbutazone, phenylbutazone,
thiazides, and triamterene. Bromides in serum will not be
distinguished from chloride in routine testing, so intoxication
may show spuriously increased chloride [see also "Anion gap,"
below].

Decrease in serum chloride is seen in excessive sweating,
prolonged vomiting, salt-losing nephropathy, adrenocortical
defficiency, various acid base disturbances, conditions
characterized by expansion of extracellular fluid volume, acute
intermittent porphyria, SIADH, etc. Drugs causing decreased
chloride include bicarbonate, carbenoxolone, corticosteroids,
diuretics, laxatives, and theophylline.

 

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