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Dill




Description

This article is from the Herb Reference series.

Dill

Other Names:

Dill
Dilly
Dill Weed

Latin Name:

Anethum graveolens

History:
Once a hardy native of the Mediterranean lands and southern Russia, dill came west with the Romans, and later farther west with the American settlers. It was originally considered to be a good cure for insomnia, not so much for any sedative values it might posses, but rather on account of its digestive ones; it is, of course, a primary ingredient of babies' dill water. Dill is mentioned in Egyptian manuscripts dating about 5,000 years ago and the Romans hung wreaths of it in their banquet halls. It's name comes from an old Norse word "dilla" which means "to lull". Some societies use dill water for barter and as a love potion.

Habitat:
Dill is native to Europe as well as North and South America.

Description:
Stems: Hollow, finely grooved, striped dark green and white with bluish spots.

Flowers: Umbrella like groups of light yellow flowers.

Leaves: Bluish green, bipinate, with filiform leaflets.

Fruit: Small, ovoid, ribbed seeds.

Height: 2 to 3 feet high

Cultivation: Annual. Because of its height, plant it toward the back of your herb garden, in full sun if you can manage it. Make sure it has good drainage, and if you intend to grow the herb from seed, sow it in March or April. Thin to 1 1\2 feet apart. Dill is an inviting meal to Tomato Worms. The most effective weapon against this is DIPEL, a biological agent that targets Tomato Worms.

Properties:
Dill contains two essential oils: limonene and carvone
Aromatic
Antispasmodic
Galactogogue
Carminative
Diuretic
Calmative
Uses:
The seeds contain the most essential oil. However for culenary purposes the stem and leaves are also used. It is valuable as a digestive aid, and a cure for hiccups. For hiccups boil the seeds and inhale the fumes.



 

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