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Phytolaccaceae




Description

This item is from "Some Common Medicinal And Poisonous Plants Used In Ethiopian Folk Medicine" work, by Amare Getahun.

Phytolaccaceae

Phytolacca dodecandra L'Hérit.

endod (A)

endoda (G)

endott, shebeti, shipti, sobet (T)

This is a relatively common plant throughout Ethiopia, especially in the semi-highland regions.

The root is used in the treatment of excessive pellagra (kuruba).

The decoction of the root (1 in. long) is used in the treatment of gonorrhoea.

There is also a wide application made of the root to cause abortion. The dosage must necessarily be regulated to avoid death of the woman.

It is believed the male plant (cut in mid-October) effectively serves in the treatment of many internal diseases. Here too, the, decoction or extraction must be diluted to the desired strength and effect, for, if too strong, it will kill the patient.

The harvested, dried, and ground fruit makes a good detergent as it probably contains saponins. Drying is necessary, however, for prolonged storage for use during the course of the year.

The plant is also reported to be used by farmers to treat their domestic animals during birth troubles, primarily to cause abortion.

The plant (extract) is sometimes added to local drinks such as tej to produce a stronger drink. This practice must be considered risky.

The plant is generally toxic to stock. Wat, local sauce, is also made from endod .

Note: This plant may in general, have a potential application in biological control. Recent investigations by the Pathobiology Institute, Haile Sellassie I University, Ethiopia, have indicated its potential use in the control of schestosomiases (bilharzia) by destroying the snail (Lemma, 1971).

 

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