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9.22) Treating Tinnitus: carbogen




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This article is from the Tinnitus FAQ, by markb@cccd.edu (Mark Bixby) with numerous contributions by others.

9.22) Treating Tinnitus: carbogen

From: govaerts@uia.ua.ac.be (Paul.Govaerts)
To: Sigeroo@aol.com

Dear Mr Segal

....The problem of acoustic trauma is completely different
from a large vestibular aqueduct or even a sudden deafness.
In acoustic trauma there is both physical lesion of the
hairs of the hair cells and biochemical lesion of the
auditory neurons because of toxicity of the excitatory
neurotransmittor that is involved. (Ref Prof Pujol,
Montpellier, France). The tinnitus and vertigo and I guess
also the hearing loss result from these lesions. It has been
shown that these cells may have a good potential for
recuperation and possibly also for regeneration (ref Van De
Water, Bronx, NY and Lefebvre, Liege, Belgium). By
administering vaso-active drugs and carbogen inhalation, a
massive peripheral vaso-dilation is triggered, bringing huge
amounts of oxygen and nutrients to these damaged cells.
Although one has not been able to demonstrate superior
effect of vasoactive drugs to placebo, carbogen has never
been really studied. And I have several cases with sudden
deafness (including after acoust or baro-trauma) who were
not responding to vasoactive drugs and who responded
spectacularly to carbogen, even when given several weeks
after the injury. Unfortunately this treatment has no
success when given too late, since there is no more
potential for regeneration....

Yours,

Paul Govaerts, MD, MS.

This information is courtesy of Dan Segal (sigeroo@aol.com).



 

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