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7.4) What are the common Meniere's Disease treatments? Anti-vertigo drugs? Surgical operations on the inner ear balance mechanisms?




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This article is from the Tinnitus FAQ, by markb@cccd.edu (Mark Bixby) with numerous contributions by others.

7.4) What are the common Meniere's Disease treatments? Anti-vertigo drugs? Surgical operations on the inner ear balance mechanisms?

The most common treatment for mild episodic Meniere's I guess
would be to rule out Diabetes and allergies. For the vertigo
attacks usually the prescription drug Antivert is used or the
over the counter drug Meclizine. Both tend to relive the vertigo.
For more chronic cases a low dosage of Valium can help. When
things get bad enough the next procedure is an Endolymphatic
Transmastoid Shunt. This helps to keep some of the pressure of
the inner ear. Changes in diet can help. Removal of sodium,
caffeine and alcohol can help. Usually a mild diuretic is
prescribed.

I know of several folks who keep it under control with allergy
shots and restricting their sodium intake.

If it progresses to a point where the patient can no longer
'live' with it an Eighth Nerve Section can be done. But according
to my surgeon this is an absolute last resort. It guarantees
deafness in the ear and some patients report balance problems at
night. He also claims the risks are high with this procedure
including partial face paralysis. [Ed. note: new surgical
techniques access the nerve via the posterior fossa, preserving
hearing and reducing the risk of facial paralysis. The vestibular
nerve alone can be sectioned, providing vertigo relief.]

 

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