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30 17. Advice by Health Care Practitioners often includes a collection of erms from a kinesiology course. Which ones do I need to know to help identify my own workstation ergonomic problems?




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This article is from the Ergonomics and Typing Injury FAQ, by Dan Wallach dwallach@cs.princeton.edu with numerous contributions by others.

30 17. Advice by Health Care Practitioners often includes a collection of erms from a kinesiology course. Which ones do I need to know to help identify my own workstation ergonomic problems?

A. Standing with the arms at your sides, palms facing forward, "flexion"
is folding of any joint of the body so that the angle between the parts
decreases in the forward direction, except at the knee and toes. Returning
he joint to its straight position requires "extension".

A joint which continues its extension past its straight posture is in
"hyperextension". This occurs in the hand and wrist when you pull the
fingers back.

Standing with your arms at your sides, palms facing forward, "pronation"
is the turning of your hand so that you thumb points toward your leg.
"Suppination" is the opposite movement.

 

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previous page: 29  16. I've heard many names for keyboard injuries. What do they all mean?
  
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next page: 31  18. Why does it seem like RSI from keyboarding has become such a big problem recently?