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48 Re: Buying a 6" Jointer




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This article is from the Woodworking FAQ Collection 3, by multiple authors.

48 Re: Buying a 6" Jointer

From: tpc@bnr.ca (Thomas P. Chmara)
Date: Tue, 19 Mar 91 18:44:52 GMT

In article <POLLACK.91Mar19112629@dendrite.cis.ohio-state.edu>,
pollack@dendrite.cis.ohio-state.edu (Jordan B Pollack) writes:

|> 4:) Craftsman sells small and cheap ones, which seem little more than
|> upside-down portable 3.5" planers with legs. It would be better to
|> design a "makita portable planer table." (has this been done?) Could
|> be made in two pieces on sawhorses with formica-laminated 1" particle
|> or 1.5" plywood tables. Infeed attached to heel of planer, outfeed
|> (this is the hard part!) needs to be adjustable and kept parallel to
|> the toe. Whats wrong with this? Must be something missing, like a
|> mitering and rabbeting setup...

I'm not sure what jointers you're talking about, but Sears is now reselling
a number of the Ryobi power tools, including their RE600 router and their
JP155 jointer (under their own "Craftsman" name and with the standard black-
and-red colour scheme in the plastic parts). I believe they still have their
own cruddy stuff, too, which I believe is made by Singer.

I own the Ryobi JP155 jointer for just the reasons you give. It's a honey of
a machine: weighs about 26lbs, 6-1/8" capacity; I store it on a shelf.
It has an extremely short bed, but you can buy and/or make extensions.
It was reviewed in FWW along with a big "standard"-type Delta.
The reviewer (a prof at a US school) indicated that his students would rather
pull it out of a cupboard than fiddle with the Delta they had. It was also
reviewed by BH&G Wood magazine, who found it gave the best finish of any
of the jointers (it has a router-style universal motor (yes, brushes),
electronically speed-controlled for 8000-32000 cuts/min). I have found that
I can joint 6" pine without any tearout and without worrying about which
direction I'm jointing in.
On the down side: no way to do rabbets (I have a router and a
radial, so I'm not worried about this), and a very short bed.
Hope this helps...




 

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