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27 Re: Jointer QOD (was: Need advice on Jointers)




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This article is from the Woodworking FAQ Collection 3, by multiple authors.

27 Re: Jointer QOD (was: Need advice on Jointers)

From: creagh@forestbear.Sun.COM (Creagh Yates)
Date: 8 Feb 90 00:37:54 GMT
Sender: news@jethro.Corp.Sun.COM

In article <3@fedeva.UUCP> bill@fedeva.UUCP (Bill Daniels) writes:
>creagh@forestbear.Sun.COM (Creagh Yates) writes:
>
>>Jointer Question for the day:
>>What is the proper sequence for jointing and planing a board
>>to make it FLAT? I spend every Wed at the local high school
>
>
>I always start by jointing one side of the board, cup down if possible, until
>it is flat and stable. I then place the newly flattened side against the
>jointer fence and joint one edge. Then its off to the planer where I place
>the flat side on the planer table (and if there is pronounced grain involved,
>put the end in first that will cause the least tear-out) and run it through
>in this configuration for enough passes to flatten the OTHER side. Once it
>is flat (and parallel) on both sides, I begin alternating sides through the
>planer until the board is the desired thickness. Now I am ready for the
>table saw where I will use the one edge that I earlier joined against the
>fence of the table saw to produce a board of the desired width.
>

YES! You win a hearty net.handshake, and the knowledge that you have
probably helped someone begin a project in better shape! You have
definately learned it the right way.

I wanted to bring this up because I see so many people take
a piece of rough stock directly to the planer. It must be made FLAT on
the jointer first, as you said, and then when you take it to the planer
you will have flat and parallel faces.

So the sequence is: face, edge, face, edge.

Another tip is to cut your pieces to rough sizes of length, and width if
applicable, before starting to joint them. It is much easier to joing
two 4 ft. long boards, 6 in. wide, than one 8 ft. board, 12 in. wide.

Ok, Here's another one!

How do you straighten out a long bowed board on a tablesaw, prior to edge
jointing, so that you can rough cut widths narrow enough to joint?
If you think this is just a theoretical question, I can assure you it
has saved a lot of work on badly bowed boards.
Hint: The concept is similar to scribing.




 

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