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92 Re: Biscuit joiner recommendation




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This article is from the Woodworking FAQ Collection 2, by multiple authors.

92 Re: Biscuit joiner recommendation

From: gringort@wsl.dec.com (Joel Gringorten)
Date: 5 Nov 91 23:18:36 GMT

In article <22613@adobe.UUCP>, bennett@adobe.com (Bennett Leeds) writes:
|> Short version:
|>
|> I'm soliciting recommendations on a biscuit joiner. Please email to
|> bennett@adobe.com and I'll post a summary. Thanks.
|>

Oh my... Bennett asking about biscuit joiners? You mean you're
not going to dovetail all the moldings in your new home? :-)

Unfortunately I don't have a good recommendation, but I do have a
negative recommendation. Stay away from the Porter Cable.

I bought a new PC-555 several months ago and have used it quite a bit.
After the first couple of projects, I got frustrated by the terrible
inaccuracy of the thing. I'd spend time scraping and sanding joints
to make them flush. I finally decided that the reason for the
error was because of significant play in the motor housing slides.
I called up Porter Cable and to their credit they informed me
there was a factory retrofit available. They replaced the base of
the joiner with a new design that had adjustment screws to take the
slop out of the slides. Unfortunately, this new base has only one
adjustment screw per slide, which is stupid, because it still allows
the motor housing to rock. I'm thinking of drilling and tapping a
couple of more holes to add more screws to try and get the thing
better. It does join marginally better with the new base, but NOT
PERFECT. I'd say the error range is almost 1/16. This is ok for
carpentry but definitely not good for furniture.

When you are evaluating biscuit joiners, I would make the following test.
Grab the fence in one hand and the motor housing in the other, preferably
with the joiner flat on a table and try and rock the motor in relation
to the fence. Any slop here will translate directly into error in your
joints.

Virgil claims that his similarly priced Freud has NO slop. I'd also
look at the Elu, which is the only BJ I know that doesn't use slides;
instead they use a pivoting system. This makes a lot of sense because
you can probably develop a pivot with less play than a slide.




 

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