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90 Re: Biscuit Joiners




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This article is from the Woodworking FAQ Collection 2, by multiple authors.

90 Re: Biscuit Joiners

From: srbeckle@cbnewse.att.com (steven.r.beckle)
Date: 25 Apr 91 14:24:42 GMT


>> I have just recently started reading this newsgroup and have found
>>it very informative. The question I have concerns biscuit joiners. Being
>>the devout Norm fan that I am, I feel somewhat inadequate without a biscuit
>>joiner in my workshop. According to Norm, the biscuit joiner appears to be
>>the best thing in woodworking since carbide!
>>
>>Do others agree with this opinion?
>>If you do use a biscuit joiner, what type do you reccomend?
>>1. The hand held variety (ie. Freund ?)
>>2. The table mounted variety (ie. Delta)
>>

I agree with Norm, but I didn't buy mine because of his recommendation.
I heard so many horror stories about doweling jigs for glue-ups on
boards, and knew I wanted something better. I bought a Porter-Cable
biscuit joiner last weekend at a wood show and I am **very**
pleased with it. Ironically, my first test of it was not to join
boards, but to assemble several basic box frames. Each box is just
four 4-piece frames connected together. With the P-C, I was able to
assemble each box completely w/o clamps, nails, etc -- the biscuit
joinery held it all together. I didn't use clamps until the box
was completely built. What a time saver.

I have used it since then on a glue-up, and it does the job. The P-C
is well built, is the quietest one on the market according to one
book I read ( after I bought the tool :-) ), and easily controlled
with one hand. I won't say that no shop is complete without one, but
I seriously doubt you'll be sorry if you get one, regardless of the
brand. I would recommend, though, that you stay away from the Skil
model. It's just their basic grinder attached to a fancy plunge
mechanism. It's the cheapest on the market, and I almost bought it.
Glad I didn't - the extra $35 I spent for a "real" one was money
well spent.




 

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