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7.A.b. What is pinning and how is it done? (Miniatures Painting)




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This article is from the Miniatures Painting FAQ, by Brenda Klein tierna@agora.rdrop.com with numerous contributions by others.

7.A.b. What is pinning and how is it done? (Miniatures Painting)

Pinning is a method of securing multiple-piece miniatures
by drilling small holes and inserting wire before gluing
in order to reinforce the joint. Required are a pin vise,
suitable size drill bit, thin wire (copper wire, paper clip
wire, anything like that) and either cryanoacrylate model
glue or epoxy. Complete instructions come courtesy of
Bill Thacker (wbt@babel.cb.att.com): "Either adhesive, properly
applied (that is, to "clean" surfaces) will give you a joint
strong enough to withstand normal handling. Neither is
guaranteed against serious abuse (poorly-packed figures
rattling around the trunk of your car, or being carried `by
the handful'). If you want a "very" strong joint, get a very
fine drill and some piano wire. Using a shoulder joint as an
example: drill a hole in the center of the joint, a quarter
inch or so into the body of the figure. Insert the piano wire
into the hole (you want a gauge of wire that fits well, but not
so snugly that you have to force it in the hole) and, using
side-cutting pliers, snip it off flush with the hole. This
will leave you with a chisel-point on the piano wire, just
slightly protruding from the hole.
"Now take the loose arm, align it to the figure the way you
want it set up, and press firmly. The chisel-tip on the piano
wire will have left a nice gouge showing you where to drill
the mating hole. Remove the piano wire and discard it; drill
the mating hole about a quarter inch into the arm (or as deep
as the figure allows). Cut another piece of piano wire, a half
inch or more, and insert it into the figure; then attach the
arm. You may need to trim this down until the arm fits flush
with the shoulder joint. Epoxy or superglue this in place and
the joint will never fail.
"This technique is rarely needed for something like an arm or
hand, but for assembling large figures (dragon wings!) it's
invaluable."

 

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