lotus



previous page: 3i.2 How common is chicken pox?
  
page up: Childhood Vaccinations FAQ
  
next page: 3i.4 What is the current recommendation for the chicken pox vaccine be part for children?

3i.3 What is Herpes Zoster?




Description

This article is from the Childhood Vaccinations FAQ, by Lynn Gazis-Sax lynng@alsirat.com with numerous contributions by others.

3i.3 What is Herpes Zoster?

Following chickenpox infection, the varicella zoster virus persists in
a latent form in sensory nerve ganglia without any signs of
illness. The virus can be reactivated causing herpes zoster or
shingles, which is a painful small blister-like rash in the
distribution of one or more sensory nerve roots. It is estimated that
15% of the population will experience zoster during their lifetimes.
Zoster develops most frequently among the elderly and among
individuals who are immunocompromised. Most people only have one
episode of herpes zoster; fewer than 4% will have repeated
episodes. Postherpetic neuralgia is a common complication; this
complication is more common among the elderly (25-50% of those over 50
who have shingles, but only 10% of all people who have shingles.

(Information on the effect of the vaccine on herpes zoster will be
added to this FAQ later.)

 

Continue to:













TOP
previous page: 3i.2 How common is chicken pox?
  
page up: Childhood Vaccinations FAQ
  
next page: 3i.4 What is the current recommendation for the chicken pox vaccine be part for children?