lotus



previous page: 8. Any other personal experiences which would be helpful to people considering prenatal testing for disabilities?
  
page up: Pregnancy Screening FAQ
  
next page: 1. What screening tests can be done prior to pregnancy and when should they be done? What diseases should be tested for prior to pregnancy?

9. How have people decided whether or not they wished to be told the sex?




Description

This article is from the Pregnancy Screening FAQ, by Lynn Gazis-Sax (gazissax@netcom.com) with numerous contributions by others.

9. How have people decided whether or not they wished to be told the sex?

-----------------------------------------
Anonymous response 2:

I would have liked to have known ahead of time but my husband did not. We
agreed that we would not ask and, as it turned out, it could not be seen
on the ultrasound anyway. One woman I know who had amniocentisis learned
the gender of her baby because she wanted her grandmother, who was dying,
to know whether she was going to have a boy or girl. That was somewhat of
a unique situation I thought.

-----------------------------------------
Anonymous response 4:

In general, information is a good thing. If someone else knows my baby's
sex, I'm certainly not afraid to know it too! (And for those people who
think the surprise is the fun part -- fine! We won't tell you!) On the
other hand, we are not going to take any special steps to be sure that
we find out. If the sex shows up clearly on the ultrasound, I won't hide
my eyes. If not, we can wait. I'm not so bound up in the question of
sex that it's a really critical question for me.

-----------------------------------------
Anonymous response 6:

I'm not set in one way or the other. With Aaron, we knew. It was
what we wanted. With Katelyn, we didn't (and not because we chose not
to - there was just no occasion to find out; we had no problems, so
had only one very early ultrasound, and no amnio). It was pretty neat
when I was in labor to *still* not know. My husband kept saying he
wanted to know before the baby was born. I think if the occasion came
up to find out, we'd find out, otherwise, it would be okay too. The
closer it got to the time for the baby to be born, the easier it was
to *not* know. :-)

-----------------------------------------
Anonymous response 7:

We decided we wanted to know. I think the philosophy behind it was that,
whether now or at birth, the gender would be the same, so why not? The
little one, however, was not being cooperative. The tech thinks it is a
boy, but she couldn't be certain because the baby kept curling up and
hiding the info from her.

-----------------------------------------
From Dena Rollo:

see above.

-----------------------------------------
Anonymous response 9:

I wanted to know the sex from the beginning and knew what it was
before all the amnio etc was carried out. Of course it was nice
having the amnio confirm the sex.















 

Continue to:













TOP
previous page: 8. Any other personal experiences which would be helpful to people considering prenatal testing for disabilities?
  
page up: Pregnancy Screening FAQ
  
next page: 1. What screening tests can be done prior to pregnancy and when should they be done? What diseases should be tested for prior to pregnancy?