lotus



previous page: I. Do you have any experience with nursing while pregnant or tandem nursing? Is it really feasible? How did you manage to nurse two (or more!) children at a time? What kind of schedule was the older child on? Any advice for someone considering it?
  
page up: Breastfeeding Past the First Year FAQ
  
next page: Had anyone pumped milk past the first birthday, or have any information about the benefits of doing so? How could I deal with my olympic freestyle nurser?

II. Did you use a code word for nursing? If so, what was it and who started using it first, you or the child? At what age? If not, did you wish you did?




Description

This article is from the Breastfeeding Past the First Year FAQ, by Kim Smith with numerous contributions by others.

II. Did you use a code word for nursing? If so, what was it and who started using it first, you or the child? At what age? If not, did you wish you did?

Michelle Mauldin <mak@fuzine.mt.cs.cmu.edu>:

Hi. I can answer your second question about the code word for nursing. I
nursed my now nearly 6 year old for 3 years. I'm now nursing a 14 month old.
(both boys) With the older, we came to call nursing either "nursies" or as #1
called it: "nursie milks". Both of those were fine with me. With #2 I call
it "nursies". He doesn't verbally request. He just smiles and grabs at me.
When he talks, I won't discourage the use of nursies. If we're in public
and he wants to nurse, I just say, as with the older: "Not now ----(insert
name). We'll nurse when we get home."

-----------------------------------------------------------------
Mary J. Cole <mjcole@arco.com>:

Yes, we used 'boob'. As in would you like a boobie? Some boobie would
be pretty good right now! In retrospect we wish we had chosen our codeword
more carefully. Elizabeth started using it at ~11.5 months. I've been glad
that we have a word that was easy for her to pronounce. It made it easy for
her to learn it; her first words were in order dada, mumma, boob, kitty. It
makes it easier that we know what she wants exactly, I just wish we'd thought
about it more carefully and used a more discreet word.

-------------------------------------------------------------------
Heather Madrone <madrone@cruzio.santa-cruz.ca.us>:

With Morganne, we used the code word "snuggle", which came out "nuggle". She
would also ask for "other side", even for the first side! It was pretty
funny to have her finish up one side and cheerfully say "Nuggle - other
side!". I initiated the code word sometime in the early part of the second
year, since I strongly suspected we might be nursing for quite a while.

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Bonita Kale <bf455@cleveland.Freenet.Edu>:

Kind of. We called it "milk". Worked very well. When the kid's in
the supermarket asking for milk, and you're telling him/her to wait till you
get home, no one looks twice. I think it was very necessary. I knew a woman
who used "suck" and wished she hadn't. Another kid learned "titty" from his
dad, embarrassing his mom no end in public. One friend had a kid who called
nursing, "drinkaback", which at least is private! I don't know what age they
learned to say "milk"; it came along with Mama and Dada and cheese and cookie
and that kind of thing. All this was many years ago; my youngest is 15 now.

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Suzanne Jacobs <sj@palm.com>:

Never used a code word, and never felt the need. But, both my kids weaned/
are weaning (I think) at 18.5 months, so they didn't really talk that much.

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Audrey Ishizaki <aud@ncd.com>:

My son does use a "codeword" for nursing: "muh". I suspect that it's
derived from "milk", which my husband tried to get Dale to say. I then
encouraged the word "muh" (because, as I told my husband, milk comes from
the carton in the refrigerator!). I'm not sure how old Dale was when he
started using it - my guess is around 16-18 months (his first words were
about 15 months). My son started using "muh" and I picked it up from him.

It's not very embarassing a word - when he's crying, it simply sounds like
he's crying for his "maa". In fact, I have to listen for the difference
between his cry for "muh" and his crying for "Maaama"

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Sue Willis <willis@sscvx1.ssc.gov>:

We call it "mommy milk", basically by accident - we found a need to
distinguish between "mommy milk" and "refrigerator milk", and the name
stuck...

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Carolyn Olive <olive@esmlsun.gatech.edu>:

We did (and still do) use a code word. It is 'nonny'. My older son Ben
made it up when he was starting to talk, at around 18 months. I had
been calling it 'nursie' or just 'nursing' and I guess that is what it
sounded like to him. When Nick came along we tandem nursed, and 'nonny'
is the word he heard all his life, so that is what he called it too.

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Karen Plomp <karen@ankh-morpork.hacktic.nl>:

No, Cees is now 22mo and I am not having problems with not using
one. When he wants to nurse he comes to me and says: 'Cees breast'.

 

Continue to:













TOP
previous page: I. Do you have any experience with nursing while pregnant or tandem nursing? Is it really feasible? How did you manage to nurse two (or more!) children at a time? What kind of schedule was the older child on? Any advice for someone considering it?
  
page up: Breastfeeding Past the First Year FAQ
  
next page: Had anyone pumped milk past the first birthday, or have any information about the benefits of doing so? How could I deal with my olympic freestyle nurser?