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2.4 Allergy Desensitization (injections)




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This article is from the Children Allergies and Asthma FAQ, by Eileen Kupstas Soo kupstas@cs.unc.edu with numerous contributions by others.

2.4 Allergy Desensitization (injections)

One treatment for inhalant allergies is desensitization. This
is not available for food allergies.

In desentization treatment, the patient is injected with small,
dilute extracts of the inhalant allergens. The dosage is gradually
built up, until the body is less sensitive to the allergen. This is a
slow process, involving months to years for a complete treatment,
though there is benefit even after a few months for many. Initially,
the patient receives two shots per week. This is reduced to one shot a
week, then one every other week over time. The initial treatment,
however, involves visits to the doctor (or a medical place that will do
the injections) rather regularly. The actual time to get the injection
is about 20 minutes -- the injection is quick, but the patient is
usually asked to wait in the office for about 20 minutes to see if a
reaction develops. These reactions occur in a small percentage of
patients but they need to be treated promptly.

Desentization can also be used for insect sting allergies.
Your doctor will know whether this is an appropriate treatment in your
particular case.

 

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