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45 Poisonous houseplants




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This article is from the Canine Medical Information FAQ, by Cindy Tittle Moore with numerous contributions by others.

45 Poisonous houseplants

In assessing the risk to your dog from these plants, you need to
consider both the age of your dog and it's propensity to chew on
plants. Many of the below toxic plants rarely cause problems because
most dogs don't chew them -- the exceptions being, of course, young
puppies who are inclined to explore the world with their mouths,
teething dogs who may chew on _everything_, and older dogs that are
simply fond of chewing. Oleander, for example, is rather toxic, but
most cases of poisoning involve 1) cattle, other grazing livestock 2)
puppies and 3) human babies/toddlers.

Dumb cane is probably the one plant that should always be kept out of
reach, since it takes only one nibble to have a potentially fatal
situation.

(from Carlson & Giffin.)

* That give rash after contact with the skin or mouth:
(mums might produce dermatitis)

chrysanthemum poinsettia creeping fig
weeping fig spider mum pot mum

* Irritating (toxic oxalates), especially the mouth gets swollen;
tongue pain; sore lips; some swell so quickly a tracheotomy is
needed before asphyxiation:

arrowhead vine majesty boston ivy
neththytis ivy colodium pathos
emerald duke red princess heart leaf (philodendron)
split leaf (phil.) saddle leaf (phil.) marble queen

* Toxic plants - may contain wide variety of poisons. Most cause
vomiting, abdominal pain, cramps. Some cause tremors, heart and
respiratory and/or kidney problems, which are difficult for owner
to interpret:

amaryllis elephant ears pot mum
asparagus fern glocal ivy ripple ivy
azalea heart ivy spider mum
bird of paradise ivy sprangeri fern
creeping charlie jerusalem cherry umbrella plant
crown of thorns needlepoint ivy


 

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