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02 Recognizing the Problem




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This article is from the Juvenile Renal Disease, by Susan L. Fleisher

02 Recognizing the Problem

If a breeder is informed about a medical problem in a puppy she has
sold, and often she is not, or, if just the owner of the dam is
informed, and it is only one puppy in a litter about whom she is
informed, it is usually treated as an isolated incident. Unless there
are multiples in a litter, and the breeder is informed about each, the
fact that the illness from which a puppy is suffering is a genetic
disease is not recognized, and no recognition is made nor thought
given to those littermates who are carriers. Without an understanding
of the genetics involved, and most veterinarians treat isolated
incidences as being from an unknown cause rather than as Juvenile
Renal Disease, veterinarians are unable to offer counseling to
breeders, and more and more carriers are unknowingly bred. In the
breeds in which JRD is known to occur many of the puppies who fall
into the "fading puppy syndrome" and die at a young age may well have
died of JRD. Many stillborn puppies are victims of this disease.
Often, however, an affected puppy will grow normally until it is
between ten and twenty four months of age before it is symptomatic,
diagnosed and dies.


 

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