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9.8 Some Unofficial High Power Altitude Attempts




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This article is from the Model Rockets FAQ, by Wolfram von Kiparski with numerous contributions by others.

9.8 Some Unofficial High Power Altitude Attempts

Some of the high power records come by way of a posting from Chip
Wuerz (dlw@engr.ucf.edu). Chip is part of the University of Central
Florida's high altitude rocketry project. Additional information has
been taken from several issues of _Tripolitan_/_High Power Rocketry_
magazine.

(Ed. Note - Not quite sure how to handle these so I'm just leaving
them in. These records have been since beaten but given the advances
in technology, the following recognition seems noteworthy)

* * Some current records for NON-METALLIC NON-PROFESSIONAL Rockets: * *

---Top altitude holders:

Altitude: 27,576 (altitude by Adept altimeter)
Set by: Pius Morozumi
Event: Black Rock V, Black Rock Dry Lakebed
Date: July 16-18, 1993

Altitude: 24,771 feet (11.7% tracking error)
Set by: Chuck Rogers and Corey Kline
Event: Lucerne Dry Lake Bed, Lucerne, Ca.
Date June 1989, USXRL-89

Altitude: 24,662 (tracking error unknown)
Set by: Tom Binford
Event: LDRS XI, Black Rock Dry Lake Bed, Nevada
Date: August 16, 1992

Altitude: 22,211 feet (5.3% tracking error)
Set by: University of Central Florida
Event: LDRS X, Black Rock Dry Lake Bed, Gerlach, NV.
Date: August 1991

-- Highest tracked flight at LDRS-X / BALLS 1, Second all-time highest
track of a non-metallic high power rocket.

University of Central Florida's research project and altitude attempt
to break the current high-power rocketry altitude record of 24,771
feet set by the KLINE/ROGERS team in 1989. Altitude attempt had been
based on 3850 NS L-engine, new Vulcan L-750 engines deliver 3,000
(now known to be less from motor testing results) newton seconds. In
an attempt to make up power loss and to provide margin on the goal
altitude of 25,000 feet, the upper stage was delay-staged by several
seconds. Altitude predictions computer simulation program predicted
28,500 feet. Upper stage flew substantial trajectory, reaching apogee
nearly 2 miles downrange. Rocket used microprocessors /
timer-controlled staging and ejection, on-board flight data
measurement package, and a radio beacon system to locate upper
stage. Track was accomplished using red carpenters chalk. Both stages
were recovered.

 

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