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9.2 What are the major categories of competition model rocketry?




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This article is from the Model Rockets FAQ, by Wolfram von Kiparski with numerous contributions by others.

9.2 What are the major categories of competition model rocketry?

The NAR sanctions model rocketry contests throughout the USA, and
throughout the year. The contest year runs from July 1 - June 30. The
final contest for a given contest year is NARAM, usually held in
August, after the end of the contest year. The complete list of event
and rules for model rocketry may be found in the NAR "United States
Model Rocket Sporting Code," also known as the 'Pink Book.' It is
available free to NAR members, and may be ordered from NARTS. Some of
the event types are:

Altitude (1/4A - G) - The purpose is to get the maximum altitude from
a model using a specified class of engine.

Streamer Duration (1/4A - G) - The purpose is to get the maximum
flight duration from a model with a specified engine type using
streamer recovery.

Parachute Duration (1/4A - C) - The purpose is to get the maximum
flight duration from a model using a specified motor type.

Eggloft Altitude/Duration (B - G) - In this event the competitor must
launch either one to two large raw hen's eggs, depending on engine
type and specific event, and recover it/them, intact, crack-free. The
goal is either to reach the highest altitude or have the longest
duration flight, depending on the event.

Rocket Glider and Boost Glider Duration (1/4A - G) - In these events
the competitor launches a glider using a rocket engine and tries to
achieve the longest flight duration of the glider. In boost glider the
pod containing the motor may be ejected and recovered separately. In
rocket glider all parts, including the expended engine, must stay with
the model. Rocket glider is considered to be the more difficult event
because the model must be both a rocket and a glider without loosing
any parts. The CG and CP requirements for the two phases of flight are
very different. See Part 08 of this FAQ.

Helicopter Duration (1/4A - G) - In these events the model ascends as
a rocket. Rotor arms then extend by some mechanism and the rocket
slowly descends like a helicopter which has lost power.

Payload Altitude (A - G) - In these events the competitor must launch
one or more standard NAR payloads (1 ounce each of fine sand) and
recover the model. The number of payloads increases with larger engine
sizes.

SuperRoc Altitude/Duration (1/4A - G) - These events are for rockets
that have a minimum and maximum length requirement based on engine
class (0.25 - 4.5 meters). There are both altitude and duration
variations. The trick to these events is that the model may not bend
or crimp during flight.

Scale Events (also see scaleroc@yahoogroups.com) - These are
craftsmanship events where competitors build scale models of real
military or commercial rockets. Fine craftsmanship is emphasized.

* Scale: exact replicas of rockets, with major scale dimensions
verified by judges.

* Sport Scale: adherence to scale is judged from a distance of 1
meter.

* Peanut Scale: Sport Scale for small models (<30cm long or <2cm dia.)

* Giant Scale: Sport Scale for large models (>100cm long or >10cm
dia.)

* Super Scale: must include a scale launcher as well as model of
rocket; judged same as scale

* Space Systems: Sport Scale model and optional launch complex. Model
must complete a predetermined mission with the purpose of
duplicating in miniature the full-scale operation of the prototype.

Plastic Model Conversion (PMC) - This event is either loved or
hated. Competitors enter plastic models of rockets or other
aero-vehicles that have been converted to fly as model rockets.

Precision Events - These include spot landing, random duration,
predicted duration, precision duration, and predicted altitude.

Drag Race - Multi-round, elimination tournament where contestants gets
points for:
* FIRST lift off
* LOWEST altitude
* LAST to land

Research and Development - A non-flying event where contestants enter
results of research projects. Entries are judged for completeness,
contribution to rocketry knowledge, degree of difficulty, etc.

The Tripoli "Member's Handbook" currently lists competitive events for
high power models. These events are basically altitude record setting
events within a given motor power range (F through O).

 

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