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7.1 I would like to make a scale model of the rocket. Where do I start looking for technical data, dimensions, flight substantiation data, etc.?




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This article is from the Model Rockets FAQ, by Wolfram von Kiparski with numerous contributions by others.

7.1 I would like to make a scale model of the rocket. Where do I start looking for technical data, dimensions, flight substantiation data, etc.?

A great place to start looking would be Peter Alway's book of scale data,
"Rockets of the World." This book was first published in 1993. A second
edition was published (hard cover only) in 1995. This book is a reference
collection of scale data assembled specifically for modelers. Peter also
has another book, "The Art of Scale Model Rocketry." This book is
describes scale modeling techniques, and includes limited scale data. It
also includes model plans and an index of scale data sources.
See Part 2 of the FAQ for address information.

Those wanting to construct detailed models may need additional data.
This usually presents something of a problem. Back issues of
"Sport Rocketry" and "American Spacemodeling" are a source of scale
information and detailed data. The old "Model Rocketry" and "Model
Rocketeer" also had a number of articles over the years. The last
three magazines are no longer in print. With the exception of articles
in AmSpam and SRM after 1990, all photos in the above mentioned magazines
are black and white.

If none of the above sources contain data on the prototype that you
want to build, or if you require more data than is found in these
sources, then two routes are open. First, ask around - someone may
already have data on the prototype that you seek. Many (most?) people
collect data without actually ever building a model. Others never get
around to publishing their data. NASA and the National Air and Space
Museum can be good sources of data (see addresses below). If you still
have no luck in finding the data you need, try writing the manufacturer
directly. The response you get from the manufacturer depends on a couple
of factors. First, your letter must end up on someone's desk who is
sympathetic to your cause and is willing to do some digging in the
archives. Second, the data you request must still exist! - often,
blueprints, photos etc. are thrown away after the manufacturer ceases
to produce the prototype. When writing a manufacturer, be as specific
as possible about the type of data you require, and explain why you
want the material. Peter Alway has further tips for tracking down
data in his book.

There is a surprising amount of scale data out there, from simple
overall configuration drawings to those showing screw/bolt dimensions.
The following list is derived from one Kevin McKiou submitted to this
newsgroup in February of 1992. Peter Alway added to it in November of
1995. It contains the majority of the scale data that has been published
in the model rocket literature to date, as well as listings of the
"private stashes" of a few individuals.

 

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