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11.3 Custom Decals for High Power Rockets




Description

This article is from the Model Rockets FAQ, by Wolfram von Kiparski with numerous contributions by others.

11.3 Custom Decals for High Power Rockets

The techniques described here could also be used for model rockets. The
decals made this way tend to be large and `thick', so this info has been
included in the High Power section.

From: soc1070@vx.cis.umn.edu (Tim Harincar):
As a computer graphics person, I have done quite a bit of experimenting
with laser printers and making my own rocket art. I mostly stick with
clear sticky-back type stocks, they are the cheapest and most available.

I use Fasson brand, and I think its 1.5 or 2 mil. thick. It works good for
large models but is a little thick for small scale stuff. It curls right
out of the laser while it cools. Don't worry, though. It doesn't distort.
This stuff is typically available at most quick print shops. Typically
its called Crack 'N Peel.

Toner chips very easily off of the smooth finish, so be careful and as
soon as you can, spray on an over coat of clear flat enamel or lacquer.
I tape the sheet down to cardboard then spray, Leave it for a day or so.
This also makes it lie flat.

I know that blank water transfer stock is available, but its about $3 for
an 8.5 x 11 sheet. Use same method as above to preserve the image. This
is usually available at model railroad shops.

I have never seen the dry-transfer stuff, but I know its pretty popular
with the railroad folks. (that is, the pre-printed stuff).

One other option that I have wanted to try is the heat-transfer colors.
Once you have a laser image, you lay a piece of special colored film
over the image and heat either with an iron or re-run the sheet through
the laser and let the fuser do the work. The color then attaches to the
toner.

Most of these colors are metallic, but there are some standard, non-
metallic colors as well. Letraset was the first company to market
the color transfer stuff.

 

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previous page: 11.2 How do you keep in a high power motor in its mount, but still alow for the numerous lengths in which HPR motors are sold?
  
page up: Model Rockets FAQ
  
next page: 11.4 I've had several rocket body tubes ruined by the shock cord tearing into the body tube at ejection and making long slits. How can I prevent this?