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1.4 I would like to get into Large Model Rockets. What are my options? Who has NAR certified E, F and G motors today?




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This article is from the Model Rockets FAQ, by Wolfram von Kiparski with numerous contributions by others.

1.4 I would like to get into Large Model Rockets. What are my options? Who has NAR certified E, F and G motors today?

The following manufacturers currently have NAR certified E, F and G motors,
as indicated.

    Motor Class      Manufacturer            Propellant Type
   
       E             Flight Systems, Inc.    Black Powder
       E             Aerotech                Composite (ammonium perchlorate)
       F             Flight Systems, Inc.    Black Powder
       F             Aerotech                Composite (ammonium perchlorate)
       G             Aerotech                Composite (ammonium perchlorate)

There are 18, 21, 24, 27 and 29 mm diameter motors available. One
manufacturer (Aerotech) has reloadable motor casings for 18, 24, and
29 mm motors.

Several manufactuers sell rockets designed for E through G powered
flight. Refer to the previous list of addresses and get a few catalogs.
R.m.r readers have recommended kits from NCR, THOY, LOC, Aerotech,
Vaughn Brothers, Microbrick/MRED, and others. Look for the following
minimum features in E through G powered kits:
- plywood or fiber centering rings rather than paper or cardstock
- plywood, thick plastic, or G10 fins rather than balsa
- thicker motor tubes
- cloth rather than plastic parachutes
- thicker-walled body tubes

Remember to build these models stronger than smaller model rockets. Use
CA and epoxy rather than white or yellow glue. These rockets will
have to survive much higher stresses than smaller model rockets.

 

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