lotus



previous page: 23 How can I prevent software piracy? (Miscellaneous Macintosh)
  
page up: Miscellaneous Macintosh FAQ
  
next page: 25 How can I copy a track from an audio CD onto my Mac? (Miscellaneous Macintosh)

24 How can I keep a hard drive in a fixed configuration? (Miscellaneous Macintosh)




Description

This article is from the Miscellaneous Macintosh FAQ, by Elliotte Rusty Harold elharo@shock.njit.edu with numerous contributions by others.

24 How can I keep a hard drive in a fixed configuration? (Miscellaneous Macintosh)

Steve Jobs designed the Macintosh with the implicit philosophy
(which became explicit when he founded Next) of "one person, at
least one CPU." A Mac is intended to be easily customizable and
configurable. While fun, this capability does not readily lend itself
to reliability in a lab based environment where users love to
install their favorite TrueType fonts to crash your color PostScript
printer, pirated applications to annoy the SPA, RAM hogging
extensions that play the 1984 Quicktime movie in a continuous loop
as wallpaper, and two megabyte System beeps illegally sampled from
Star Trek. On stand-alone Macs you probably can't do better than
setting the locked bit of files and folders you want to protect and
praying. If you have a Syquest or Bernoulli drive, store a copy of
the hard disk the way it ought to be on a cartridge and use that to
restore the disk to the desired state.

If the Mac is attached to a network, however, then Purdue
University's freeware RevRDist can automate the process of
restoring the hard drives of any number of Macs to desired
configurations at specified times. It can replace modified files
with original copies, delete unwanted files, install new software,
replace old software that may have been disabled, reset preference
files, and, in short, take care of just about anything that depends
on the presence, absence, location or contents of specific files
(which is almost everything). RevRDist is completely configurable
and even comes with source code so you can modify it in the
unlikely event it doesn't do exactly what you want. RevRDist
does not offer specific protection against destructive users, but
it does make provisions for running off a floppy so in a worst
case scenario a hard drive can be rebuilt automatically after
booting off a specially prepared floppy. See

<URL:ftp://ftp.macfaq.com/pub/>

 

Continue to:















TOP
previous page: 23 How can I prevent software piracy? (Miscellaneous Macintosh)
  
page up: Miscellaneous Macintosh FAQ
  
next page: 25 How can I copy a track from an audio CD onto my Mac? (Miscellaneous Macintosh)