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4.1.3 What is the process for making dill pickles?




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This article is from the Food Preserving FAQ, by Eric Decker ericnospam@getcomputing.com with numerous contributions by others.

4.1.3 What is the process for making dill pickles?

You have two options, depending on time, tastebuds, and ethnic
heritage. First option is brine curing, where you scrub small size
pickling cukes clean of hairs; dissolve pickling salt into hot or
boiling water to make a brine; pack cukes, spices, and dill seed heads
in a very clean crock; pour brine over the cukes; weight everything
down with a clean plate; place crock in a cool, dark place; skim yeast
scum as it forms for several weeks, adding salt brine as needed.
[Check out the Tips 'N Tricks section for a tip to make this job
easier.] When done, you either refrigerate or pack your dill pickles
into canning jars, waterbath process. BTW, don't even think of taking
a vacation during this procedure; uncontrolled pickle crocks are the
most disgusting things in food preservation.

The second option is to make quick dill pickles by packing vegetable
spears/ chunks tightly in pre-sterilized jars with dill seed heads,
then heat a vinegar, water, salt, sugar, spice brine, then pour the
solution into the packed jars. Seal, then waterbath process.

Check out some of the cookbooks cited in the back of this FAQ for
recipes, and look at a couple of recipes at the back of this section.
I have not tried any of these so YMMV.

 

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